kay

03 Jun 2008 928 views
 
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photoblog image The Nina - visiting Portland during the Rose Festival

The Nina - visiting Portland during the Rose Festival


The Most Historically Accurate Replica of a Columbus Ship Ever Built

See it at http://www.thenina.com/nina.html  The following text was taken from the site.

The Niña is a replica of the ship on which Columbus sailed across the Atlantic on his three voyages of discovery to the new world beginning in 1492. Columbus sailed the tiny ship over 25,000 miles and purchased a half share in the vessel. That ship was last heard of in 1501,

In 1988, the Columbus Foundation hired John Patrick Sarsfield (Click here for more info on John.), an American engineer, maritime historian, and expert on Portuguese caravels, to design and construct a replica of the Niña. John had lived in Brazil while working in the Peace Corps, and had learned of an archaic ship building process called Mediterranean Whole Moulding. This was a technique used by master ship builders in the 15th Century and likely used to build the original ships. Sarsfield discovered this technique in daily use in shipyards on the coast of Bahia in Brazil. In a sleepy little fishing village called Valenca, Sarsfield slowly gained the confidence of the Valencan shipwrights and they began to share with him the secrets of their techniques. Valenca was chosen as the building site for three reasons: shipwrights were using Mediterranean Whole Moulding in conjunction with mechanically generated geometric progressions known as graminhos, techniques that may be similar or identical to those used by the builders of discovery period ships.


Today, the Nina is a floating museum, visiting ports the world over.  I did not get a chance to go on her, but they let me take pictures of the ship.  Lucky me!

The Nina - visiting Portland during the Rose Festival


The Most Historically Accurate Replica of a Columbus Ship Ever Built

See it at http://www.thenina.com/nina.html  The following text was taken from the site.

The Niña is a replica of the ship on which Columbus sailed across the Atlantic on his three voyages of discovery to the new world beginning in 1492. Columbus sailed the tiny ship over 25,000 miles and purchased a half share in the vessel. That ship was last heard of in 1501,

In 1988, the Columbus Foundation hired John Patrick Sarsfield (Click here for more info on John.), an American engineer, maritime historian, and expert on Portuguese caravels, to design and construct a replica of the Niña. John had lived in Brazil while working in the Peace Corps, and had learned of an archaic ship building process called Mediterranean Whole Moulding. This was a technique used by master ship builders in the 15th Century and likely used to build the original ships. Sarsfield discovered this technique in daily use in shipyards on the coast of Bahia in Brazil. In a sleepy little fishing village called Valenca, Sarsfield slowly gained the confidence of the Valencan shipwrights and they began to share with him the secrets of their techniques. Valenca was chosen as the building site for three reasons: shipwrights were using Mediterranean Whole Moulding in conjunction with mechanically generated geometric progressions known as graminhos, techniques that may be similar or identical to those used by the builders of discovery period ships.


Today, the Nina is a floating museum, visiting ports the world over.  I did not get a chance to go on her, but they let me take pictures of the ship.  Lucky me!

comments (9)

How interesting. Too bad you could not board. It looks surreal against the backdrop of the modern city.
Kay: Thanks, Red Pen. To be honest, they asked for cash for entry, and all I had was my bank card. So it was my fault that I could not go on the boat.
  • Astrid
  • The Netherlands
  • 3 Jun 2008, 07:56
Thank you so much for your information, as you know we have in Holland great shipbuilders too, they have their secrets, so this John is a very lucky man.
Great picture Kay, love the 'two worlds' in it.
Kay: Thank you Astrid. Yes, you are so lucky to have great shipbuilders there too. It's an art, creating a something like this, so your country is to be honoured.
If Columbus had known about George W...he might have stayed at home tongue Nice shot and interesting story Kay
Kay: LOL! Thanks, Louis.
Very interesting angle on an unknown ship - at least to me
Kay: Chris, thanks! I studied all about the original ship and sister ships La Pinta and Santa Maria. We even have a national holiday to honor Christopher Columbus. smile
  • Aussie
  • Brisbane
  • 3 Jun 2008, 12:33
Lovely capture and beautiful soft proceessing.
Kay: Thank you very much, Aussie.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 3 Jun 2008, 13:22
Good photo interesting information
Kay: Thank you, Vintage. Glad you like it.
Very nice capture Kay. Thanks for the interesting story!
Kay: Hi Richard. Thank you smile
  • Alan
  • Southampton.. sunny south coast of England
  • 3 Jun 2008, 17:44
I like the contrast between the old and the and the less old (the office buildings). Thanks for the interesting notes - it helps give this added interest. I was in Portland 2 or 3 yars ago whilst the Rose Festival was on (or perhaps when they lay out a floral display in the main square - are the two events one and the same?)
Kay: Hi Alan,
You are correct - this was taken during the Rose Festival. I'm not sure if they still lay out a floral display in the main square, however they do have lots of exhibits and booths (and carnival rides) down by the waterfront. Of course that celebration was across the river. I did not feel like merging with the crowd.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Jun 2008, 20:03
Heaven forbid to cross the 7 seven seas in such a small boat - just an oversized rowboat smile Doing the kay on this boat worked out well.
Kay: Your comments are most welcomed, Louis! You always make me smile. Thank you!

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camera Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
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focal length 17.0mm
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