kay

17 Jul 2007 488 views
 
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photoblog image Clearcutting in Oregon

Clearcutting in Oregon

Most of the pictures I post of Oregon are scenic shots that represent Oregon at its best.  However, Oregon does have its downsides: allowing the logging companies to clearcut forests, instead of cutting every third tree (thining out).

When we flew back from Tillamook, I couldn't believe all of the mountain tops with bare patches.  It looked like they've been scalped.  I hope this type of logging is discontinued...after all, we need to focus on keeping "green", right?

Update:  In it's defense, the Oregon Forest Practice Act consists of the following rules:

What do the rules say?

The rules also regulate the use of chemicals, and protect habitat for bald eagles, osprey, blue herons, and other wildlife and fish.

The Forest Practice Rules apply to all private lands in the state, whether owned by individuals or large corporations. They also apply to state-owned lands, but not to federal lands, which are regulated by the USDA Forest Service or the BLM.

(taken from http://www.forestlearn.org/forests/ofpa.htm)


Clearcutting in Oregon

Most of the pictures I post of Oregon are scenic shots that represent Oregon at its best.  However, Oregon does have its downsides: allowing the logging companies to clearcut forests, instead of cutting every third tree (thining out).

When we flew back from Tillamook, I couldn't believe all of the mountain tops with bare patches.  It looked like they've been scalped.  I hope this type of logging is discontinued...after all, we need to focus on keeping "green", right?

Update:  In it's defense, the Oregon Forest Practice Act consists of the following rules:

What do the rules say?

  • Clearcuts must be replanted within two years of harvest
  • Clearcuts can be no larger than 120 acres
  • Roads must be properly designed and built to minimize soil erosion and protect streams
  • Trees and shrubs must be left along streams
  • Some wildlife trees, snags and down logs must be left after harvest for wildlife
  • The State Forester must be notified before most types of forest operations; written plans may be required
  • Breaking the rules can result in large fines
The rules also regulate the use of chemicals, and protect habitat for bald eagles, osprey, blue herons, and other wildlife and fish.

The Forest Practice Rules apply to all private lands in the state, whether owned by individuals or large corporations. They also apply to state-owned lands, but not to federal lands, which are regulated by the USDA Forest Service or the BLM.

(taken from http://www.forestlearn.org/forests/ofpa.htm)


comments (11)

That looks pretty brutal. The view from the air is sometimes much clearer than from the ground.
Kay: So true, Martin. So true.
It's a sad sight, and not one I would have previously associated with Oregon. I hope it can be stopped.
Kay: There are activists out there, Red Pen. I hope that all of us can stop this from happening. Unfortunately, the Federal gov't doesn't have to abide by these 'rules'.
Like Red Pen this is not a sight that I would have associated with Oregon. I had always thought State was against things like this. When I first starting reading your comment I thought this was a way of stopping forest fires, got that wrong didn't I.

J
Kay: Hi Johnny, It's pretty disappointing, isn't it? The only "agencies" not responsible for replanting and cleaning up their mess is the BLM. Federal agency, of course.
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 17 Jul 2007, 04:19
Loving this capture Kay

Suby
Kay: Thank you, Suby! smile
nice rural view
Kay: Thank you, Chantal!
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 17 Jul 2007, 08:06
This pic immediately reminded me of our German Shepherd/Sheltie-mix dog when we lived in Wisconsin years ago. He had a systemic infestation of fleas which nothing would get rid of. Poor thing--he scratched the fur off his body till he had raw patches that looked exactly like this. I will never forget how much we grieved WITH him over this ailment. He was such a beautiful dog before. He was still "beautiful" to us but we wanted to cry every time we looked at him.

And so I cry now!
Kay: Aw, Ginnie, I didn't want to make you cry. I'm sorry. My family had a dog (poodle) who also had mange. Nothing is sadder than a poodle with mange!
Lets hope the rules a upheld.Love the shot all the same.
Kay: Thank you very much, Tracy!
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 17 Jul 2007, 14:31
You Americans have a Cold Mountain, a Bareback Mountain elsewhere and also a Bare-assed Mountain in Oregon tongue

You can put up this picture to show what systemic infestation of fleas looks like. Then you can tout for support to change the law and next - governor Kay. Who knows where this can end?

A great picture that definitely can demonstrate a point.
Kay: Louis, you are coming up with some good ideas. Can you be my publicist? smile
  • Neil Tandy
  • Johannesburg, South Africa
  • 17 Jul 2007, 16:48
Super shot Kay and very well presented. It really does enforce the sadness of the situation and Man's disregards for both nature and the planet we are priveleged to inhabit. Kindest wishes, Neil.
Kay: Well said, Neil. Very eloquent. Thank you!
Nice shot and interresting explanations - thank you !
Kay: I'm glad you like this one, Zeb. Thanks!
This is a problem in Britain too, although the Forest Authority employs landscape architects now to plan things better. In Britain there's also a strong prejudice against coniferous forests because they're not native - and they tend to be planted as monocultures.

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