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03 Jul 2007 947 views
 
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photoblog image The top of Mt. Hood from the Southwest

The top of Mt. Hood from the Southwest

  I've taken a few pictures of Mt Hood, but from a different direction (West). (You can see this magnificent mountain for many miles in all directions.)  Mount Hood is a little over 11,000 ft in elevation and is the second most-climbed glacier-covered peak in the world.  A lot of climbers have successfully climbed Mt. Hood.  Others who went up never made it back down the mountain.

In December 2006, three hikers were taking a practice hike up the North side of the mountain.  Unfortunately, they never made it back down the hill.  James Kelly's body was found in a snow cave. (Before he died, he managed to make sure his ring finger was visible so he could be identified.)  Two others (Brian Hall and Jerry Cooke) are still presumed to be somewhere on the mountain.  The theory is that they were so disoriented, they fell.

I remember packing for my move up to Portland when this tragic event occurred. I felt (and still feel) sorrow and loss for the three hikers' families, and I prayed for all of them and the Mt. Hood Search & Rescue teams.   

It's difficult to convey my feelings for this mountain. It is a very spiritual and demanding place.  Having been lost once, I know of the feelings that surface.  But I also know the peace that a little prayer and meditation can bring in troubled times.

Saturday, I took a quick road trip to Mt Hood and the historic Timberline Lodge.  As I got closer to the lodge, I could almost hear a chorus singing in my ears. Of course, it could have been the breeze in the thin air of the high altitude! But  the experience was very spiritual.  Very unreal.  And a little scary (I drove up there by myself).  However, I was awestruck when I saw the peak directly in front of me.  The mountain commands your attention, no matter the view.

After I took the picture you see here (there are a few others taken from lower elevations which I will post),  I turned around and zipped back down the hill.  It was about 6:30 p.m., and I did not want to have to drive down and through the Cascades in the dark.  It takes about 1.5-2 hours for the drive back, depending on where you live in the Portland Metro area.

In any case, I wanted to get a picture for Florence, who asked me if there's snow all year round on Mt. Hood.  Well Florence, this is what it looked like on June 30th, 2007!  (The Timberline Lodge is just to the left of the picture.  I did not go inside due to time restrictions. ) The web site says you can ski here through September 3rd.  See
http://www.timberlinelodge.com/

For a real snowy image, you can see what it looked like when the Search and Rescue team left the lodge to look for the three missing hikers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hood#Climbing_accidents

For those of you traveling this week, please be safe.  And make sure your loved ones know where you are...

The top of Mt. Hood from the Southwest

  I've taken a few pictures of Mt Hood, but from a different direction (West). (You can see this magnificent mountain for many miles in all directions.)  Mount Hood is a little over 11,000 ft in elevation and is the second most-climbed glacier-covered peak in the world.  A lot of climbers have successfully climbed Mt. Hood.  Others who went up never made it back down the mountain.

In December 2006, three hikers were taking a practice hike up the North side of the mountain.  Unfortunately, they never made it back down the hill.  James Kelly's body was found in a snow cave. (Before he died, he managed to make sure his ring finger was visible so he could be identified.)  Two others (Brian Hall and Jerry Cooke) are still presumed to be somewhere on the mountain.  The theory is that they were so disoriented, they fell.

I remember packing for my move up to Portland when this tragic event occurred. I felt (and still feel) sorrow and loss for the three hikers' families, and I prayed for all of them and the Mt. Hood Search & Rescue teams.   

It's difficult to convey my feelings for this mountain. It is a very spiritual and demanding place.  Having been lost once, I know of the feelings that surface.  But I also know the peace that a little prayer and meditation can bring in troubled times.

Saturday, I took a quick road trip to Mt Hood and the historic Timberline Lodge.  As I got closer to the lodge, I could almost hear a chorus singing in my ears. Of course, it could have been the breeze in the thin air of the high altitude! But  the experience was very spiritual.  Very unreal.  And a little scary (I drove up there by myself).  However, I was awestruck when I saw the peak directly in front of me.  The mountain commands your attention, no matter the view.

After I took the picture you see here (there are a few others taken from lower elevations which I will post),  I turned around and zipped back down the hill.  It was about 6:30 p.m., and I did not want to have to drive down and through the Cascades in the dark.  It takes about 1.5-2 hours for the drive back, depending on where you live in the Portland Metro area.

In any case, I wanted to get a picture for Florence, who asked me if there's snow all year round on Mt. Hood.  Well Florence, this is what it looked like on June 30th, 2007!  (The Timberline Lodge is just to the left of the picture.  I did not go inside due to time restrictions. ) The web site says you can ski here through September 3rd.  See
http://www.timberlinelodge.com/

For a real snowy image, you can see what it looked like when the Search and Rescue team left the lodge to look for the three missing hikers.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Hood#Climbing_accidents

For those of you traveling this week, please be safe.  And make sure your loved ones know where you are...

comments (14)

  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 3 Jul 2007, 01:46
You have absolutely captured the "awful" majesty of this place, Kay, and your words have set the tone for what you see in this pic. I can well understand why it feels both spiritual and eerie at the same time. Glad you made it safely down the mountain!
Kay: Oh, you are so nice, Ginnie! It is a very amazing place. I really respect that mountain...it's very powerful. Thank you! (And I am very glad I made it down that mtn too!)
I was so struck by your description of this photo, as well as the story you are sharing, Kay..both your words and image say so much about you. Very touching.
Every now and then, from the island here, I see Mount Baker in the distance...huge and always snow packed even in the summer. Perspectives like these are amazing reminders of both our fragility and place in the world.
Kay: Thank you for your comment, so well written. I went flying yesterday with my pilot friend and his wife. I believe we saw Mt. Baker, but I could be wrong. We saw 4 snow-covered peaks. It was amazing!
Me Likes Kay wink
Kay: Thank you, Nacha! smile
This is a fabulous photograph, Kay. It is majestic and awe-inspiring. Reading your text, I can quite understand your spiritual connection to it. (:o)
Kay: Thank you so much for your comment Rosalyn.
  • Les Auld
  • Southport UK
  • 3 Jul 2007, 07:51
Good image Kay, shows the majesty of the mountain.
Kay: Thank you for visiting and for your comment, Les smile
Lovely picture makes you feel like your there.
Kay: Thank you, Tracy wink
Excellent capture Kay. Looks a hard terain
Kay: Thank you, Busola smile
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 3 Jul 2007, 14:29
Excellent shot of a beautiful place. Mountains are at the same time rough and beautiful. There are few places you can feel so alone than when hiking a mountain on your own - my experience limited to SA and in the summer with no snow.
Kay: Thank you Louis. I so agree with you.
definitely emanates majesty...well captured...
Kay: Thank you, Sam.
  • paul
  • 3 Jul 2007, 17:24
Its a wonderful photograph Kay which is really enhanced by your story.
Kay: Thank you very much for reading it, Paul! The story was rather long smile
  • Suby
  • Milton Keynes, UK
  • 3 Jul 2007, 18:40
What a cool name for a mountain, Mt Hood smile

Lovely capture Kay

Suby
Kay: Thank you very much, Suby smile
  • Ellie
  • 3 Jul 2007, 23:35
These mountains always seem to carry tales of personal tragedy with them, but it doesn't make them any less beautiful. Thanks Kay for sharing the story, and thanks too for making the journey to take this lovely picture.
Kay: Hi Ellie, Thank you very much for reading the story, and for leaving such a lovely comment! wink
Very refreshing and nice landscape ! Very nice and deep comment too smile
Kay: Thank you for taking the time to read what I wrote, Zeb. I'm glad you like this picture too! smile
  • Helen
  • 6 Jul 2007, 00:51
That is stunningly beautiful! I can't wait to get up to Portland!
Kay: Hi Helen! You'll love it out here! I will be posting pictures of more aerial shots (taken over farmland, woodland and the coast). We went flying yesterday. Can't wait to show you them!

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camera Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
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sensitivity ISO320
focal length 85.0mm
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